Entropy Trading Co.

LOVE. I saw the above print over on Design Crush and immediately went over to Entropy Trading Co. shop to pick me up a copy. Since I couldn’t find a listing I am assuming they have sold out of the print or haven’t re-stocked yet. I am hoping for the latter because I desperately want one for my wall.

I LOVED all three books in The Hunger Games trilogy and very much look forward to the movie opening this Friday. No, I will not be standing in line tomorrow night for the midnight showing, but I do have a movie date set for early next week!

This is the first I have heard of Entropy Trading Co. and I have to say, they have some pretty clever print designs. A couple of my faves are below!


I will ALWAYS have a soft-spot for Harry Potter! [Harry Potter Inspired Subway Sign 24″ x 36″ Poster]


I am a sucker for Mad Men! [MADMEN – Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce 11″ x 14″ Poster]


all images are from the linked sources above

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Melancholia

“Justine (Kirsten Dunst) and Michael (Alexander Skarsgård) celebrate their marriage at a sumptuous party in the home of Justine’s sister Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and brother-in-law John (Kiefer Sutherland). Despite Claire’s best efforts, the wedding is a fiasco with family tensions mounting and relationships fraying. Meanwhile, a planet called Melancholia is heading directly towards Earth threatening the very existence of humankind…”

I finally got around to watching Melancholia, directed by Lars Von Trier, last night and WOW – it was incredible. The cast was great; I’ll watch anything with Kirsten Dunst in it. The visuals were stunning and the score was haunting. Overall, it was a very beautiful movie.

Have you seen it it yet? I wish I had the good sense to see it while it was in theaters. I bet seeing the planet Melancholia in that brilliant blue on the big screen was magical.


photos top to bottom:

Kirsten Dunst in MELANCHOLIA, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures. Photo © Christian Geisnaes.

Kirsten Dunst, Alexander Skarsgaard, Kiefer Sutherland and Charlotte Gainsbourg in MELANCHOLIA, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures. Photo © Christian Geisnaes.

Kirsten Dunst in MELANCHOLIA, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

Kirsten Dunst and Charlotte Gainsbourg in MELANCHOLIA, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures. Photo © Christian Geisnaes.

PAGE ONE and Photo 2.0

At the heart of the film is the burning question on the minds of everyone who cares about a rigorous American press, Times lover or not: what will happen if the fast-moving future of media leaves behind the fact-based, original reporting that helps to define our society?

Last night I finally got around to watching PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES.

I was most interested in the conversation that unfolded focusing on new/social media. David Carr at one point says, “Why talk when you can tweet?”, and I instantly flashed back to the Photo 2.0 — Online Photographic Thinking panel discussion with Andy Adams (moderator), Molly Landreth, Amy Stein and Philip Toledano at the SPE Northeast conference last month at Light Work. I’m just realizing now I never posted about it! Where did this last month go?! Anyways, I’ll get around to it, but in the meantime I would like to point out a moment at the end of the discussion when everyone was packing up and leaving for dinner. I walked up to the podium to introduce myself to Andy Adams and found myself waiting in line. While I was on deck, I was behind a woman who was voicing her disgust regarding the presence of Twitter during the panel discussion. See, before the conversation even started, Andy had invited the audience to participate in the Twitter feed using the hashtag #FlakPhoto and/or mentioning @FlakPhoto. While the four panel participants were discussing Photo 2.0 you could look around the auditorium and see more than half of the room tweeting away on their smart phones and devices. I know I was tweeting and re-tweeting and having even Andy re-tweeting my tweets! That was the point! We’re sharing news and communicating on a global scale in real time.

Speaking of real time, the panel discussion was streaming live! Participants were not limited to those sitting in the auditorium of Light Work, but they really could have been viewing and interacting from anywhere.

The question proposed in the quote above, “what will happen if the fast-moving future of media leaves behind the fact-based, original reporting that helps to define our society?” Why does it have to be one or the other? Something to think about, that’s for sure!

I do not subscribe to The New York Times (printed newspaper or online). Honestly, I don’t see a need to. Considering I currently work for a printed journal, I realize how that statement is pure blasphemy. I follow @nytimes and @nytimesarts (among others) on Twitter. I watch my local news. I feel like I’m getting my fill. What do you think? Do you still buy the paper? Why or why not?

__
photos from the Official Movie Site
caption information: A scene from PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

PAGE ONE and Photo 2.0

“At the heart of the film is the burning question on the minds of everyone who cares about a rigorous American press, Times lover or not: what will happen if the fast-moving future of media leaves behind the fact-based, original reporting that helps to define our society?” –Page One

Last night I finally got around to watching PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES.

I was most interested in the conversation that unfolded focusing on new/social media. David Carr at one point says, “Why talk when you can tweet?”, and I instantly flashed back to the Photo 2.0 — Online Photographic Thinking panel discussion with Andy Adams (moderator), Molly Landreth, Amy Stein and Philip Toledano at the SPE Northeast conference last month at Light Work. I’m just realizing now I never posted about it! Where did this last month go?! Anyways, I’ll get around to it, but in the meantime I would like to point out a moment at the end of the discussion when everyone was packing up and leaving for dinner. I walked up to the podium to introduce myself to Andy Adams and found myself waiting in line. While I was on deck, I was behind a woman who was voicing her disgust regarding the presence of Twitter during the panel discussion. See, before the conversation even started, Andy had invited the audience to participate in the Twitter feed using the hashtag #FlakPhoto and/or mentioning @FlakPhoto. While the four panel participants were discussing Photo 2.0 you could look around the auditorium and see more than half of the room tweeting away on their smart phones and devices. I know I was tweeting and re-tweeting and having even Andy re-tweeting my tweets! That was the point! We’re sharing news and communicating on a global scale in real time.

Speaking of real time, the panel discussion was streaming live! Participants were not limited to those sitting in the auditorium of Light Work, but they really could have been viewing and interacting from anywhere.

The question proposed in the quote above, “what will happen if the fast-moving future of media leaves behind the fact-based, original reporting that helps to define our society?” Why does it have to be one or the other? Something to think about, that’s for sure!

I do not subscribe to The New York Times (printed newspaper or online). Honestly, I don’t see a need to. Considering I currently work for a printed journal, I realize how that statement is pure blasphemy. I follow @nytimes and @nytimesarts (among others) on Twitter. I watch my local news. I feel like I’m getting my fill. What do you think? Do you still buy the paper? Why or why not?


photos from the Official Movie Site
caption information: A scene from PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.


01/28/12
PLEASE NOTE: originally posted on my old blog, I’m slowly moving over my favorite posts!